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Month: August 2013

The Shell

by Peter Cherches

Microsoft Word - The Shell.doc

[Editor’s Note: Click on the triptych for a full view.]

Peter Cherches has been called “one of the innovators of the short short story” (Publishers Weekly). For over three decades his prose work has focused on the ultra-minimal, culminating in his most recent collection of short prose sequences, Lift Your Right Arm (Pelekinesis, 2013), which Luc Sante called “the equivalent of a whole shelf of books.”

Yours is one of our first triptychs. What did you think of the process/product?

I’ve always been somewhat of a “conceptual” writer, though, unlike the writers of the current conceptual poetry movement, I see concept as a means rather than an end; ultimately, what matters most to me is the quality of my sentences. And my work has been informed by music and visual art as much as by literature. So when I saw the call for triptychs I immediately knew it was something that would be right up my alley. Much of my work is self-reflexive, and lately I’ve been playing around a lot with autobiographical material as well as fake autobiography. This form allowed me to indulge all these impulses. In the left column I became the character of author commenting on the work. In the right column I could add the equivalent of footnotes, some of which intersect with the “story” only by coincidence. So, then, is that “the piece” in the middle column, or are all three columns the piece? I love having made something that could lead me to me ask that question. And maybe this is the fourth column of a tetraptych.

LOVINGS

by Richard Kostelanetz

[Editor’s Note: Matter Press will be publishing five (5) single-page LOVINGS, from Richard Kostelanetz’s forthcoming book.]

Richard_Kostelanetz-lovings-1_Page_3


Individual entries on Richard Kostelanetz’s work in several fields appear in various editions of Readers Guide to Twentieth-Century Writers, Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature, Contemporary Poets, Contemporary Novelists, Postmodern Fiction, Webster’s Dictionary of American Writers, The HarperCollins Reader’s Encyclopedia of American Literature, Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, Directory of American Scholars, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in American Art, NNDB.com, Wikipedia.com, and Britannica.com, among other distinguished directories. Otherwise, he survives in New York, where he was born, unemployed and thus overworked.

Choose Life

by Robert Bradley

She’s blonde and pale, just the kind of person you’d like to see naked on a ledge somewhere. Her skin bleared against the red brick of the building, her palms pressed against them, looking more puzzled than afraid or sad.

He sips his beer and wonders if she’s the one for him.

“You look like an angel,” he says to her. He imagines the things he would do to her if that were true.

“Holy, holy, holy,” she says, brushing ashes off her sleeve.

He leans towards her.

“Nothing’s forbidden down here,” he says.

“I don’t need that,” she says.

“What are you made of?” he says.

“Buy me a drink and I’ll show you what I’m made of,” she says. “Get me some smokes, too.”

He stands, drains his mug; imagines her naked above him, singing in a gravelly voice.

He parks himself on a wobbly barstool next to her and orders two drinks.

As he reaches into his pocket for cash she says, “That’s right. You pay,” she grabs him by the throat and his eyes widen. He likes the intimacy of this moment, the palm of her hand pressed to his throat, her fingertips tensing into the flesh of his neck, everything exaggerated, pulsing, the world shrunk down to the size of a beach ball with just enough stale air left to starve his brain of the oxygen it needs to make rational decisions, get up and leave.

“Halleluiah,” someone on the juke box sings.

“There’s no more room in heaven,” she says and stubs her cigarette in a tin, gets up and pushes past him. “Make way.”

“Right,” he calls after her, “heaven’s for dead people, anyway. I choose life. Bartender…”


Robert Bradley is holed up in an apartment in Manhattan. He has a plate of chicken and rice in his refrigerator along with a jar of spaghetti sauce, some butter, broccoli and four beers. He’s going to sit down and write a screenplay any minute now. You can almost see it.

The first version of “Choose Life”existed between “he” and “I” for the point of view. You went with “he.” Why?

I thought it sounded better, less clumsy. But now I don’t know. Thanks for reviving for your pleasure the writer’s agony, that of linear decision making and second guessing. A torturous process, as you’re well aware.

El Fin del Mundo

by Clare Kirwan

El Fin del Mundo

[Editor’s Note: Click on the triptych for a full view.]

Clare Kirwan is from Wirral, England. Her stories have been published in 3:AM Magazine, The Binnacle, Dark Tales, Contrary, Flax, Short, Fast and Deadly and Little Fiction’s Listerature. Her flash fiction collection: Tales From a Broken Biro is available on Amazon. By day she is a library assistant — like Batgirl.

Anything you forgot to tell us (your readers)?

I forgot to tell…Along the wall on the seafront at Ushuaia is written Ushuaia: end of the world, the beginning of everything

LOVINGS

by Richard Kostelanetz

[Editor’s Note: Matter Press will be publishing five (5) single-page LOVINGS, from Richard Kostelanetz’s forthcoming book.]

Richard_Kostelanetz-lovings-1_Page_2


Individual entries on Richard Kostelanetz’s work in several fields appear in various editions of Readers Guide to Twentieth-Century Writers, Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature, Contemporary Poets, Contemporary Novelists, Postmodern Fiction, Webster’s Dictionary of American Writers, The HarperCollins Reader’s Encyclopedia of American Literature, Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, Directory of American Scholars, Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in American Art, NNDB.com, Wikipedia.com, and Britannica.com, among other distinguished directories. Otherwise, he survives in New York, where he was born, unemployed and thus overworked.

I Had Trouble with Comparisons

by Matthew Salesses

The boy brought home a cardboard box and set it on the kitchen table like it meant something. I sorted through looking for worth. (more…)

Two Weeks Later He Flew Off to Afghanistan Again

by Barry Basden

Microsoft Word - Barry_Basden-Two_Weeks_Later_He_Flew_Off_to_Afg


Barry Basden lives in the Texas hill country. He edits Camroc Press Review and is coauthor of CRACK! AND THUMP: WITH A COMBAT INFANTRY OFFICER IN WORLD WAR II. He is currently working on a collection of compressed pieces related to war, which has long fascinated him.

Yours will be our first published triptych. What did you think of the idea?

I fell in love with the idea of a triptych as soon as I saw the call for submissions and set to work immediately. It lets authors add historical context and be as playful or serious as they want, going off on tangents to entice the reader down trails away from the actual story. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve begun researching something and come to my senses hours later far from where I started. The Internet makes this easy and your triptych project is an apt complement.

I have been working on this story for a while now and your 300 word limit helped. I cut 50 words and I’ve never liked it better. As a Matter Press triptych, it’s found the perfect home.

LOVINGS

by Richard Kostelanetz

(more…)

A Recipe

by Barbara Black

You start with love, then you fry a fish. (more…)

VISUAL POEMS

by Nance Van Winckel

Part II: ALTERED GUIDE BOOK PAGES

[Artist’s Statement: Pages from Nance Van Winckel’s ebook in progress, entitled SIT DOWN AND SHUT UP: altered pages from the 1964 Official Guide to the New York World’s Fair.]

HALL OF RUINS

HALL OF RUINS


Nance Van Winckel’s digital collage work has appeared in Handsome Journal, The Cincinnati Review, Em, Dark Sky, Western Humanities Review, and other journals. Excerpts from a collage novel are forthcoming in The Kenyon Review. She has also had collage work in various galleries, juried and solo shows, and museums. Her sixth collection of poems is PACIFIC WALKERS (U. of Washington Press, 2013); a fourth book of linked stories will be out in July. She teaches in the MFA in Writing Program at Vermont College of Fine Arts. To see more of her visual poems, visit: http://photoemsbynancevanwinckel.zenfolio.com/.

News

Submissions

Poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction/prose poetry submissions are now open. Check out our new category triptychs! The submission period closes December 15, 2108; submit here.

Upcoming

11/19 • Dan Crawley
11/26 • Bruce Robinson
11/28 • Madeleine McDonald
12/03 • Marina Carreira
12/10 • Edwin Litts
12/17 • Christopher James
12/24 • Bree Pie
12/31 • Sara Backer
01/07 • Kim Magowan
01/14 • Justin Herrmann
01/21 • Su-Yee Lin
01/28 • Nathan Long
02/04 • Paul Crenshaw
02/11 • Kevin McLellan
02/18 • Emanuele Pettener
02/25 • Jeff Friedman
03/04 • Dennis Mombauer
03/11 • Jacqueline Doyle
03/18 • Tamara Gane
03/25 • Sara Crowley